andypbrowne

Spot to display personal artwork, but mainly a swipe-file for inspiration.

yalegraphicdesign:

David Rudnick (MFA Class of 2016)

Looks like everything else Yale has ever produced. What is the deal with you guys? Same diet of negative space, closure, continuation and that a-whole Paul Rand?

yalegraphicdesign:

David Rudnick (MFA Class of 2016)

Looks like everything else Yale has ever produced. What is the deal with you guys? Same diet of negative space, closure, continuation and that a-whole Paul Rand?

greatcomet:

Improbable as it sounds, but ain’t it all—the next moment had me hugging the rock, holding on as I moved through space in what seemed like infinite velocity and ferocious stillness, holding on with faith, trust and seeing dear life after life as I rode that icy comet. From a burning rock to a fireball, the white heat cooled to white light, rock shrouded in gas and layers of ice. Riding that comet with all of my heart and all of my might, I saw his story, the comet’s journey as it traveled across the universe since its cataclysmic inception. An imprisoned force, one of Saturn’s children had been set free. Ancient wanderer, I saw the oceans rise and recede, first man and woman emerging from giant Turtle ships. Making bricks of clay and planting seeds in the desert earth, the trees, children and villages all grew over many seasons and vast ranges. I saw this all wiped away in deluge, disaster and constant change. And the comet’s tail reached so far behind me, traveling for what looked like aeons past, it wrapped itself round the world like the cosmic dragon that it truly was.
The Comet’s Tale

moth: Comet and solar corona, photographed by SOHO, April 2004.
Comet Bradfield (C/2004 F4) at and just after perihelion. This animation uses 23 images taken 17th-19th April, about one every two hours. At its closest, the comet was about 25 million km from the sun (16% of the Earth-Sun distance).
C/2004 F4 was discovered by William Bradfield, amateur astronomer and prolific comet hunter: The most prolific comet hunter of all was Jean-Louis Pons (1761-1831) with 37; the second William Robert Brooks (1844-1921) with 26; Bradfield has discovered 18.
The most prolific comet detecting instrument, incidentally, is SOHO, with more than 2,500 discoveries.  
Image credit: NASA/ESA/GSFC. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

greatcomet:

Improbable as it sounds, but ain’t it all—the next moment had me hugging the rock, holding on as I moved through space in what seemed like infinite velocity and ferocious stillness, holding on with faith, trust and seeing dear life after life as I rode that icy comet. From a burning rock to a fireball, the white heat cooled to white light, rock shrouded in gas and layers of ice. Riding that comet with all of my heart and all of my might, I saw his story, the comet’s journey as it traveled across the universe since its cataclysmic inception. An imprisoned force, one of Saturn’s children had been set free. Ancient wanderer, I saw the oceans rise and recede, first man and woman emerging from giant Turtle ships. Making bricks of clay and planting seeds in the desert earth, the trees, children and villages all grew over many seasons and vast ranges. I saw this all wiped away in deluge, disaster and constant change. And the comet’s tail reached so far behind me, traveling for what looked like aeons past, it wrapped itself round the world like the cosmic dragon that it truly was.

The Comet’s Tale

moth: Comet and solar corona, photographed by SOHO, April 2004.

Comet Bradfield (C/2004 F4) at and just after perihelion. This animation uses 23 images taken 17th-19th April, about one every two hours. At its closest, the comet was about 25 million km from the sun (16% of the Earth-Sun distance).

C/2004 F4 was discovered by William Bradfield, amateur astronomer and prolific comet hunter: The most prolific comet hunter of all was Jean-Louis Pons (1761-1831) with 37; the second William Robert Brooks (1844-1921) with 26; Bradfield has discovered 18.

The most prolific comet detecting instrument, incidentally, is SOHO, with more than 2,500 discoveries.  

Image credit: NASA/ESA/GSFC. Animation: AgeOfDestruction.

greatcomet:

The Comet’s Tale by Paul Seftel, 2014. Design by Andy Browne

First Edition. A long time coming, I’m delighted to share my story with all of you now. A tale of personal experience that has taken me many years to understand, let alone narrate for your entertainment, education, and enlightenment.

A book of 7 chapters, a cosmic adventure and coming of age story is unveiled. I lived it, for the love of it, and felt it valuable to write about it.


My desire for others to read it is the same as for my desire to share my painting: creative expression and imagination; for your own pleasure and deeper connection to the inner worlds we all inhabit.

Call on the cosmos within…

Get a copy HERE

Lena, space cat. Digital piece made for “Portraits of Hope.” a benefit for Ollie’s Place Animal Rescue. The process with this work involved working in negative with some waxy colored pencils. The composition was then reversed in the computer and minimally color corrected. Looking forward to participating next year!

Lena, space cat. Digital piece made for “Portraits of Hope.” a benefit for Ollie’s Place Animal Rescue. The process with this work involved working in negative with some waxy colored pencils. The composition was then reversed in the computer and minimally color corrected. Looking forward to participating next year!

Looks like 20 mile visibility today. Crisp winter air.

Looks like 20 mile visibility today. Crisp winter air.

itsfullofstars:

skyscraper:

the-iridescence:

This digital project by Paris-based photographer Thierry Cohen is an imaginative tale about how urban landscapes might appear if we turned out all of the lights. In a big city glowing with street lamps, store signs, car headlights, and rows of illuminated apartment buildings, it’s almost impossible to see the stars in the sky. One project review says, “Atmospheric and light pollution combine to make looking into the urban sky like looking past bright headlights while driving.”

To bring a sense of nature back into these environments, Cohen has taken a bit of a scientific approach. He travels to places free from light pollution and captures the skies that rotate on the same axis as the urban skylines. Those same skies that were at some point visible above the cities are then superimposed into the darkened cityscapes.

The result is Darkened Cities, Cohen’s project in which cold, dark, and desolate cityscapes sit below these atmospheric wonders overhead. In a sense, Cohen is bringing a forgotten nature back into these places. His darkened landscapes are a frightening visual of what it might look like if a city had to be completely shut down. His images are a reminder of the magical beauty of nature and through this project, he encourages viewers to take a step back from the hustle and bustle of everyday life and to appreciate—most importantly, not take for granted—the natural world around us.

Wow

***

Beautiful art with starry night.

Facebook finally gets with the video editing shortcuts. Wonder if they got that from @Tumblr :)

Facebook finally gets with the video editing shortcuts. Wonder if they got that from @Tumblr :)

iParty Headquarters: Andrew Paul Browne's Campaign »

It’s great to be here at the VFW! Texas is a must win state on November 6th, and with your help, we’re going to win! Thanks for coming out on this patriotic day and being ready to talk about some stylish issues. This place is such a hub of bike and roller blades, I always really tragic…

Guys it’s another rainbow! A good omen for the home team, @caughtmapping in the home stretch! (Taken with Instagram)

Guys it’s another rainbow! A good omen for the home team, @caughtmapping in the home stretch! (Taken with Instagram)